fbpx

Refugee and migrant youth make up an important proportion of the youth population in Australia and the high proportion of youth unemployment.

With current levels of youth unemployment sitting at 12.36% and a high proportion of our refugee and migrant intake being youth, these kids already face an uphill battle.

Young people from refugee and migrant backgrounds often face numerous challenges and more transitions into adulthood than their Australian-born counterparts. Settling into a new culture, society and new schooling system makes for a difficult and daunting transition.

Adolescence is a period of life that is understood as a time where young people begin to take on more responsibilities, they experience the complexities of psychological and intellectual growth and begin to forge a sense of identity.

Although many have experienced the trauma of the refugee experience and the difficulties of resettlement, it is important to note that young people come to Australian with a range of strengths. This may include broad cross-cultural knowledge, adaptability and resourcefulness.

In the wake of the 2016 Youth Summit on July 20, Chief Commissioner Graham Ashton affirmed, giving young people the opportunity to work and study was key to assisting youth to reach their full potential.

“Some of these young people felt it was easier for them to steal than to get a job. They felt the odds of landing employment diminished even further if they had a criminal record — or perhaps if they were from certain ethnic communities” - Graham Ashton.

The nervousness of applying for your first job, someone outside the family home to see your capabilities is felt by everyone. This anxiety would surges if you felt isolated from your community and marginalised because of your ethnicity.

Here at Tomorrow Foundation, we are taking active measures to change the lives of migrant and refugee youth in Australian.

Help us make The Common Social cafe a reality and change the statistics of unemployed youth in Melbourne.

Donate now!